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THE NEW WORLD  ORDER
although they are quite impossible, as every
steady-headed person who can estima te the
available supplies of petrol knows—and they
have a terrible dread of being held responsible.
They fear a day of reckoning with their long-
bamboozled lower classes. In their panic they
are rapidly breaking up the existing order
altogether.
The changes that have occurred in Great
Britain in less than a year are astounding. They
recall in many particulars the social dislocation
of Russia in the closing months of 1917. There
has been a shifting and mixing-up of people
that would have seemed impossible to anyone
in 1937. The evacuation of the centres of popula-
tion under the mere exaggerated threat of air
raids has been carried out by the authorities in
a mood of frantic recklessness. Hundreds of
thousands of families have been broken up,
children separated from their parents and
quartered in the homes of more or less reluctant
hosts. Parasites and skin diseases, vicious habits
and insanitary practices have been spread, as
if in a passion of equalitarian propaganda, from
the slums of such centres as Glasgow, London and
Liverpool, throughout the length and breadth
of the land. Railways, road traffic, all the normal
communications have been dislocated by a
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